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Market Trends: World War II Firearms Hot at German Auction House

Market Trends: World War II Firearms Hot at German Auction House/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d345349b_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d345349b_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Roland Gleixner — Hermann Historica oHG, Munich, Germany The German auction house Hermann Historica has seen steadily increasing demand for Walther and Mauser pistols made between 1930 and 1945, noted the establishment’s firearm expert, Roland Gleixner. Related GunDigest Articles Surging Interest in World War II Japanese Firearms Photo Gallery: RIAC September Premier Firearms Auction Preview Photo Gallery: Sneak Peak at James D. Julia's Firearms Auction Best Starter Kit for Concealed Carry: S&W M&P 9 SHIELD $394.96 guns.com Safariland IWB Holster $43.99 brownells.com Safariland Duty Belt $88.99 brownells.com SnagMag Ammo Pouch $LOW! gundigeststore.com Disclosure: Some of these links are affiliate links. Caribou Media Group may earn a commission from qualifying purchases. Thank you! Top bids are going for any of these World War II firearms made for the German Wehrmacht, “and other state institutions with the corresponding military, police, navy, air force, NSDAP and protection squad markings,” said Gleixner. At a recent auction, for example, a Walther PPK ZM in 7.65mm, of the type given to political leaders, complete with the original holster and produced in 1937, sold for 9,600 Euros, far above the minimum estimated pre-auction price of 5,500 Euros (1 Euro equals $1.13 U.S.). Even more impressive, a Walther PP ZM owned by Col. Walter Oesau of the German Luftwaffe, and manufactured in 1940, sold for 32,000 Euros. Oesau, Head of Fighter Command Bretagne, was awarded the Knight's Cross with Oak Leaves and Swords, flew 300 missions and was killed during his last mission in April 1944.

Expedient Family Survival Water Filter

Expedient Family Survival Water Filter

The ability to purify water in an emergency situation is not a “nice thing to have”, it is an essential part of your preparedness plan.  Whether you are planning to bug in or bug out, safe drinking water is the foundation for survival. In my never ending quest for DIY (Do It Yourself) survival tools, I have found a way to purify larger quantities of water at a low cost for my survival community using gravity.  Although for some it would be easier to go with a turn key solution such as a Berkey water purification system , I wanted a low cost system that I could afford to keep in multiple locations (cars, home, bug out location, work, storage locker, etc.) Quick Navigation Components: Prep Work: Assembly: Options:

Photo: Peshmerga with m16A2 and Acog Targets Isis Flag

Photo: Peshmerga with m16A2 and Acog Targets Isis Flag

Looks like we have a classic combo: The M16A2 and Trijicon TA01 mounted on the carry handle. True, it is a fuzzy photo, but you can clearly see the windage drum on the right, and the channel in the carry handle. This picture is from Kurdish social media. Another photo: A Kurdish soldier has a Dragunov with a Russian optic. This is another weapon I would love to shoot, but sadly we only import PSL type Kalashnikovs into the US. A Kurdish Soldier rests with a Dragunov I hope I can find more pictures of Kurdish weapons. It appears they have a bit more inventory aside from just Kalashnikovs. Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Red Rifleman Vol: 2 @ LooseRounds.com

Red Rifleman Vol: 2 @ LooseRounds.com

Hope you guys had an awesome Christmas! Ever wondered how Vietnam Era War Trophy Rusty AK magazines preform in a modern day AK? Well here is your answer: Check it out over at www.looserounds.com! In case you missed Red Rifleman Vol:1 here is the link! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print visit website

Best Handgun Calibers For Survival

Is there really a “best” of anything?  Well, yeah, I think A-1 steak sauce is the absolute best.  I love St. Pete’s Signature blue cheese . Diamond D Leather in Alaska makes the best across the chest crossdraw handgun holster on Earth.  I am a huge fan of Kimber 1911 pistols, Smith and Wesson heavy revolvers and ARs in 5.56 and 300 Blackout, and my Ruger SR556-6.8 SPC AR (just try to find one of those left on the shelf), which I clearly think are the best.  Well, at least those are the best for me anyway. Quick Navigation A Commonly Posed Question Decision Making Time Apples and Oranges Narrowing the Choices A "Commonly Posed Question" When I work the gun shows with the Glock armorer guys, I usually get many of the same questions at our show tables.  “I want to buy a first handgun for my wife.  What caliber should I buy?”  That question is often quickly followed by the No. 2 question, “Should I get a revolver or a pistol?”  Several other questions almost always follow that.  I try to offer the best council I can based on what I know about their situations, conditions, and experiences.  I’ve done this for over 40 years now. I get nearly the same series of questions from people inquiring about the “best” caliber for survival prepping.  These questions are more difficult to comprise to offer individuals specific recommendations.  Many factors go into the decision to pick a handgun caliber for survival work and then to pick the platform to fire it.  Let’s explore some of the possibilities. A Chart of Common Handgun Calibers’ Power Ballistics Caliber           Bullet Weight      Muzzle Velocity      Muzzle Energy 22 LR                 40                           1150                           117 25 ACP               50                           760                            64 32 ACP               71                            905                            129 380 ACP            95                            955                            190 38 Special         158                         755                            200 357 Magnum    158                         1235                          535 9mm Auto         124                        1100                         339 40 SW                 180                        990                           392 10mm Auto       180                        1150                          529 41 Magnum       210                        1300                         788 44 Magnum      240                        1180                          741 45 ACP                230                        835                           356 45 Long Colt      250                       860                           410 Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA As it is with spotting a seemingly attractive woman at a distance, looks can be deceiving especially upon closer examination.  It is much the same with factory ammunition ballistics charts as well.  Unfortunately these listed factory muzzle velocities and energy ratings are about all we have to go on when it comes to comparing one caliber against another.  It does at least offer us a baseline for comparison.  Reality in the field is something entirely different. Know, too, that this list contains only the most basic bullet and power level for each caliber.  Many, many other choices are available in bullet types, and power capacities.  Get yourself a factory ammo catalog from Remington, Winchester, or Federal to begin to understand the other options available in each caliber. "Decision Making Time" First, as you make the ultimate decision to arm yourself, your immediate family and/or your survival prep team, ask yourself exactly why for what purpose(s).  I will presume the No.1 reason is for self-protection, as well as defensive protection of family, home, and property.  Other reasons could be for foraging for wild game food, or offensive actions to secure goods for yourself under the most dire straits of circumstances.  For whatever reason you buy a gun(s) for a prepping assignment do not take the purchase of weapons lightly and be fully prepared to accept all the consequences.  This includes safe handling, learning to shoot properly, practicing to shoot, and maintaining your tools in top operating condition. Related: Survival Shotgun You may have already settled on some prejudiced decisions about what handgun caliber you want to obtain for prepping use.  They may be right on or not for you or others in the immediate circle you intend to arm.  Seek as much input as possible from people who should know what they are talking about.  Good advice on guns does not always come from behind the counters at a gun store, in particular the big box retailers where gun sales people are rarely well trained on guns or ballistics. Try a shooting range , a shooting course, or a concealed weapons course.  Walk around a gun show and ask several vendors as you check out their wares.  That is a next step anyway once you finally (maybe) settle on the caliber(s) you want then go shopping for and the handgun models to deliver them. Apples and Oranges Meanwhile study these ballistics numbers and try to make some obvious judgments.  I am guessing you have probably done some preliminary reading or research on line, from contacts, at gun shops or shows, books , magazines or other resources.  If not, then you definitely need to build an elementary foundation of knowledge on these subjects enough to know on what to spend your hard earned prepper money.  If you make a mistake, you waste money. If you need a hint, then take this one.  If your primary purpose for obtaining weapons is to protect yourself, family, friends, or others, then you obviously need a handgun shooting a caliber as capable as possible in stopping an adversary. Be honest with yourself.  While a .22 LR rimfire handgun may be ideal for taking small game for the meat pot or taking out small nasty vermin around the Bug Out camp , it is not a realistic choice for self protection.  It is better than nothing, but not for your primary defensive handgun. Also Read: Best Survival Carbine I will be so bold as to suggest the same for the .25, 32, and even the .380.  Once you acquire a more prominent caliber handgun for defense and become proficient with it, then you can branch out to consider acquiring other calibers and guns as your budget allows.  These three could make decent back up calibers with proper ammunition.  Now we have arrived at a “Y” in the road.  Whether or not you want a revolver or a pistol?  I won’t discuss those merits or distracters here, but may at another time review those points. At the low end of the revolver caliber considerations is the .38 Special, but why buy a handgun only for this cartridge?  The .357 Magnum revolver will also shoot the .38 Special so you essentially get two guns in one.  The .357 Magnum will stop an opponent, but you may be limited to six shots.  This revolver caliber is formidable.  Reloading takes more skill and time. Generally speaking the .41, .44 and .45s are not considered for personal protection though they could be.  Eventually if you are settled on revolvers, then consider stepping up to a larger caliber.  By the way, the .44 Magnum will also load and shoot the .44 Special.  Remember these calibers are more difficult to shoot well, costly, and the ammo is heavier to deal with for storage and carry. The other pathway in the “Y” considers the semi-auto pistol calibers.  These are the 9mm, .40 Smith and Wesson or “40 cal”, the 10mm and the .45 ACP.  The 9mm is basically a .38 caliber suited to the pistol platform.  The .40 and the 10mm are similar though the 10mm is considerably more powerful, expensive and has more recoil. The .45 ACP is the “King of the Hill” for most pistol shooters.  Obviously it was picked by the military early in the 1900s for a reason.  There are rumors now the .45 ACP may be coming back to service use, but somehow I suspect it will only be relegated to specialty team use.  The .45 ACP has more recoil, more noise, but the 45 caliber is a serious man stopper.  It takes a lot of practice to shoot well, as frankly does any handgun in any caliber for that matter. Narrowing the Choices An ideal method to settle on a choice on a handgun caliber is to visit a shooting range or gun shop that has a wide variety of gun models and calibers to actually shoot.  This way you can evaluate your comfort level in shooting different calibers and the types of guns available in those caliber choices.  It would be akin to test driving new cars. Now, here I go out on the limb by suggesting my own recommended choices.  If you favor the revolver action because of its simplicity in use without mechanical safeties to deal with, then I would opt initially for a .357 Magnum, but not a lightweight, short-barreled gun model.  Pick a good steel gun with a six-inch barrel and adjustable sights.  If you learn to use this well, then you might consider adding another bigger caliber much later. For pistol operators, the base choice is the 9mm.  It is very universal in all regards, and widely available both in gun models and ammunition types.  Practice with ball ammunition, but carry in Condition One with a serious self-defense round of which there are many new ones on the market now. Personally, I am not a big fan of the .40SW.  It has more recoil, and muzzle blast.  Ammo is more expensive.  However, the .40 is an effective pistol caliber for personal protection.  I do like the 10mm but it is a significant step up in skills to shoot well.  It is a good defensive people stopper using the right ammo. Also Read: SIG Sauer P227 Nitron Review The .45 ACP is my No.1 personal choice.  That big .230 grain bullet packs a wallop on its opponent especially in a defensive round with expanding bullets, not the ball ammo.  The .45 takes much practice to shoot really well, but in close quarters it is a deal changer.  It is not a first caliber choice for uninitiated neophyte shooters.  If I were starting afresh to build a self-defense survival handgun arsenal, then I would have a 9mm and then a .45 ACP.  If I had multiple guns, they would all be the same brand and model for uniformity of training, and use as well as exchange of magazines, parts, cleaning supplies and carry holsters. Is there a best handgun caliber for survival prepping?  Yes there probably is for you, but it may not be the same one for me.  What is really best is what you can shoot really well.  Obviously one or more well placed rounds are better than making a bunch of noise and missing the target.  Study hard, pick carefully, and then become extremely proficient with your choices.  That will be what is best for you. All Photos by Dr. John J. Woods Other interesting articles: Survival Gear Review: Smith & Wesson .380 Bodyguard Backup Building a Basic Defensive Arsenal Survival Debate: 1911 or Glock "Survival Gear Review" : Gum Creek Vehicle Handgun Mount

The 4 Best .22 Pistol Scopes – Reviews 2020 Photo by Brian Bennett / CC BY The .22-caliber handgun has grown in popularity recently, due to the rise in handgun sales and folks looking to shoot an affordable, low-recoiling training or hunting pistol. Ruger even resurrected the Charger platform to meet the demand. A .22-caliber handgun is easy to shoot but made even more so with the addition of an optic. Since there is a wide variety of .22 pistols, you have to expect a wide variety of .22-caliber optics. Some handguns like the Ruger Charger is designed for long range shooting, which a magnified optic with a traditional crosshair reticle would work better. Other .22 Pistols, like the S&W Victor or Walther P22 with a scope mount, would work better with close range optics—sights that allow rapid transitions and quick target engagements. Here below are our suggestions for the 4 best .22 pistol scopes on the market: Simmons Pro Hunter Truplex Simmons ProHunter Truplex Reticle Handgun Scope, 2-6x32mm (Silver) Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 12:20 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Simmons is a respected maker of rifle and handgun scopes that are well known for their affordability and their reliability. The Pro Hunter pistol scope is an excellent scope for a long range .22 handguns. The Simmons offers a variable magnification that ranges between 2 to 6 power. This is perfect for bench resting the weapon and maximizing accuracy. The 32mm objective lens sits on the large side of handgun scopes but is capable of gathering light in all situations, including low light situations. The Simmons Truplex scope has fully multi-coated lenses that provide a high definition level of quality when it comes to sight picture. The Simmons Prohunter is stainless steel and is nice and attractive, but, more importantly, weather resistant. The Simmons Pro hunter uses a simple reticle consisting of a crosshair that is thin enough to allow easy viewing of far targets. The Pro Hunter has a true zero windage and elevation adjustment system that allows for a locked in zero, regardless of the rounds fired. The Pro Hunter is fog proof, waterproof, shockproof, and recoil proof. The Pro Hunter is a high-quality optic that allows shooters to get a clear line of sight on the target, and always hit where they’re aiming. This should belong on anyone’s list of the best .22 pistol scope (just check out the video below--it’s the same scope but with a matte finish). Ruger Charger Takedown - 25 shots @ 100 yards Watch this video on YouTube

Summary

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